School of Social, Historical and Political Studies

History

MA Part-time 2 years

The course gives students a solid experience in postgraduate study and research.

The course gives students a solid experience in postgraduate study and research.

Why choose this course?

The course gives students a solid experience in postgraduate study and research. It prepares those who wish to go on to a PhD with the necessary insights and skills to allow them to pursue their interest in history yet further. The focus on the twentieth century makes this the ideal choice for those seeking a challenging course for the purpose of continuous personal development. The taught elements (6 of 7 modules) are based around maximum choice and permit students to choose from the Master’s-level modules available within the department. The very scheduling of the taught modules adds another layer of flexibility, in that some modules are taught on weekday evenings, others on select Saturdays in the year. Through its flexibility and choice, as well as the robust student support that lecturers and the library offer, this course will continue the long tradition of inclusivity prevalent at the University, which benefits those electing to study with us. We trust that upon completion of the course, students themselves become ambassadors for inclusiveness wherever they choose to go thereafter.

The advantages of studying for an MA History at Wolverhampton include:

  • being taught by specialists and leading historians in the field of 20-th century history in the UK, who have proven and respected research and publications records and reputations for excellence in teaching
  • An innovative and broadly-based curriculum that offers a unique and thorough examination of the modules' themes while giving you complete freedom of choice of modules from a broad range of military, social, and cultural history
  • Being part of a dynamic History and War Studies group. With some modules running in the evening, some during the day, through 'study days' on selected Saturdays, and across the academic year, this programme facilitates you fitting your studies around your life.

What happens on the course?

Teaching, learning and assessment has been designed in line with the principles embedded in the University Inclusivity Framework. It recognises the diverse backgrounds of the student body and provides a clear framework for them to develop their skills, confidence, and ability, whilst also taking account of their individual circumstances and needs. The curriculum is diverse and includes a wide range of viewpoints to provide a challenging and rewarding education.

Students will be able to develop their self-efficacy and become empowered, autonomous learners throughout the course, culminating in the completion of independent research-based dissertation. To ensure academic success and enhance employability skills, you will be expected to take part in learning via listening to and taking notes on lectures; engage in structured discussion; take part in student-led presentations; read specified texts and identify additional and relevant materials beyond what is suggested; and access relevant programme- and module-specific documentation via a suitable electronic medium. You will also be expected to engage in primary research.

You will have access to appropriate lecturer-produced course documents (e.g. module guides, assessment briefs and other core documentation).

Online and/or in-class activities will provide formative learning opportunities, and you will engage with fellow students in your cohort via a suitable electronic portal or medium as well as in class.

Each module has clearly indicated methods of assessment linked to the stated learning outcomes. Thus a variety of interactive learning activities will support the achievement of the course learning outcomes.

Critical reflection, reflexivity and collaborative learning will be vital components of this course. You will encounter a number of learning activities during a variety of formal lectures, seminars and tutorials. You will be expected, and directed, to read from a range of sources, working both autonomously and interactively within group exercises.

Both formative and summative assessment tasks will enhance your opportunities for learning, meaning that you will experience a range of assessment methods to demonstrate achievement of the learning outcomes. All assessment tasks will be commensurate with study at postgraduate level, and provide a learning opportunity for you through the tasks set and promote improvement in performance in the future through the feedback provided.

Emphasis will be placed upon a synthesis and evaluation of academic best practice contextualised. You will be required to produce critiques of theory and research and analyses. Across the course there will be use of verbal presentations and discussion of written preparation notes and plans. Formative assessment and feedback opportunities will be provided through in-class discussions and tutorials, as well as feedback on written work. At the University of Wolverhampton, a variety of modes of assessment will be used to support and test your learning and progress, and to help you develop capabilities that are valued beyond your University studies and into your working life. Your course may include a variety of assessment activities:

  • Written examinations (including online examinations, open and closed book examinations and quizzes)
  • Coursework (for example, essays, reports, portfolios, project proposals and briefs, CVs, poster presentation)
  • Practical (for example, oral and video presentations, laboratory work, performances, practical skills assessment).

At the end of your postgraduate degree, you are likely to be expected to write an extended piece of work or research, such as a dissertation or a practice-based piece of research. Our assessment strategy underpins our commitment to inclusivity and employability by creating digitally literate, enterprising postgraduates.

Course Modules

Potential Career Paths

Employability in the curriculum has been designed with reference to the Wolverhampton Framework for Course Design. The course will develop students’ abilities to communicate orally and in writing and to be ICT competent and able to source, interpret, critically evaluate, and share information. Successful completion of this course will enhance your career prospects. It will be particularly relevant to researchers, journalists, political, and central government professionals, civil servants, teachers, plus charity and campaign workers. Attainment of the MA degree can also lead to doctoral research.

The MA History provides you with a pathway into various careers in academia, teaching, heritage, social work, and potentially the legal professions, and is a solid foundation for doctoral research in cognate subject areas, where a Master’s qualification is often regarded as a sine qua non.

Alternatively, this MA – though non-vocational – will prepare you for work in a variety of professions that require data collection and analysis, especially qualitative data, along with a sound grasp of how to investigate the parameters (context) in which a given phenomenon or question needs to be considered. Whether you aim for further study or employment, this MA qualification is designed to give you the confidence and the skills to distinguish yourself in an increasingly competitive job market.

Additional Information

Everything you need to know about this course!

The advantages of studying for an MA History at Wolverhampton include:

  • being taught by specialists and leading historians in the field of 20-th century history in the UK, who have proven and respected research and publications records and reputations for excellence in teaching
  • an innovative and broadly-based curriculum that offers a unique and thorough examination of the modules' themes while giving you complete freedom of choice of modules from a broad range of military, social, and cultural history
  • being part of a dynamic History and War Studies group. With some modules running in the evening, some during the day, and through 'study days' on selected Saturdays, and across the academic year, this programme facilitates you fitting your studies around your life.

  • Self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional or equivalent level. NEW FWW&SWW MA LO1: Analyse critically the key issues and debates informing the history of the twentieth century.
  •  Originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to create and interpret knowledge in the discipline. NEW FWW&SWW MA LO2: Negotiate, design and undertake independent research based on secondary, primary, archival and digitised sources.
  • Ability to deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate your conclusions clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences. NEW FWW&SWW MA LO3: Exercise critical, evaluative and analytical skills in relation to historiographical debates and sources concerning the history of twentieth century.

Location Mode Fee Year
Home Part-time £3275 per year 2021-22
Home Part-time £3998 per year 2022-23

These fees relate to new entrants only for the academic year indicated for entry onto the course, any subsequent years study may be subject to an annual increase, usually in line with inflation.

Postgraduate Loyalty Discount:

You can get 20% discount on a taught postgraduate course if you’re a University of Wolverhampton Graduate.

The University offers a generous 20% Loyalty Discount to students progressing from an undergraduate programme to a taught postgraduate on-site programme, where both courses are University of Wolverhampton Awards.

There is no time limit on how long ago you completed your degree as long as this is your first Masters level qualification.

The discount applies to the first year of enrolment only. Students who receive a loyalty discount are not entitled to any further tuition discount or bursary. For full terms and conditions click here.


Self-funded:

If you are paying for the fees yourself then the fees can be paid in 3 instalments: November, January and April. More information can be found by clicking here.


Sponsored - Your employer, embassy or organisation can pay for your Tuition fees:

Your employer, embassy or organisation agrees to pay all or part of your tuition fees; the University will refer to them as your sponsor and will invoice them for the appropriate amount.

We must receive notification of sponsorship in writing as soon as possible, and before enrolment, confirming that the sponsor will pay your tuition fees.


Financial Hardship:

Students can apply to the Dennis Turner Opportunity Fund for help with course related costs however this cannot be used for fees or to cover general living costs.


Charitable Funding:

You might also want to explore the possibility of funding from charitable trusts; please see the following websites Association of Charitable Foundations, Directory of Social Change or Family Action. Most charities and trust funds offer limited bursaries targeted to specific groups of students so you will need to research whether any of them are relevant to your situation.

You can find more information on the University’s Funding, cost, fee and support pages.

Telephone

01902 32 22 22

Email

enquiries@wlv.ac.uk

Online

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