School of Humanities

English Language and Linguistics

BA (Hons) Full-time 3 years, Part-time 6 years

The English Language and Linguistics integrated joint offers students the opportunity to explore a wide range of language related topics in a stimulating and multi-cultural environment.

The English Language and Linguistics integrated joint offers students the opportunity to explore a wide range of language related topics in a stimulating and multi-cultural environment.

  • Institute Code W75
  • UCAS Code QQ31
  • Entry Requirements View
  • Fees View
  • Course Specifications View
  • Start Date(s) 21 September 2020, 12 January 2020
  • Award BA (Hons)
  • Study Mode Full-time, Part-time
  • Course Length Full-time (3 years), Part-time (6 years)
  • Campus Location Wolverhampton City Campus
  • School School of Humanities

Why choose this course?

The English Language and Linguistics integrated joint offers students the opportunity to explore a wide range of language related topics in a stimulating and multi-cultural environment. By means of high quality teaching and a flexible, responsive and vocationally relevant curriculum, students will learn about how meaning is created, not only through choices of words and grammatical structures, but through wider social and cultural contextual factors. Students will learn about the diverse ways in which languages in general, and the English language in particular, vary and change according to time, geographical location, and to factors such as the status, class or gender of the speakers. Students will develop a range of subject specific and transferable skills, including higher order conceptual and communication skills, enterprise, digital literacy and IT awareness, all of which are of immense value in graduate employment.

In the 2015 National Student Survey this course achieved 95% student satisfaction rate!

What happens on the course?

 

The English Language modules that form part of this degree focus on textual analysis and on variation in language. At level one, students analyse the way meaning is constructed in texts and they also study the history of English. At levels two and three, emphasis is placed on language use in its social and cultural context. Students analyze diverse accents, dialects and world varieties of English, as well as looking at factors such as culture, class and gender. Students also examine the ways in which relations of power influence the production of texts in society.

The Linguistics modules address the fundamental concepts of language. Year one explores word and sentence structure, the sounds of language, second language acquisition, and important issues in applied linguistics. At level two, students look in greater detail at phonology/phonetics, morphology and syntax, as well as the constraints on language imposed by social context and stylistic choices. They also have the chance to study language meaning (i.e. semantic and pragmatic theory), and to take a language-based research methods module. Year three explores those aspects of structural and applied linguistics not previously covered, and includes a specialist module on language and the mind. 

 

Course Modules

Potential Career Paths

Additional Information

Everything you need to know about this course!

The team prides itself on giving individual attention to students. We believe in interactive learning and encourage full participation from all our students: external examiners have consistently highlighted our innovative assessments as a major strength.

In the 2015 National Student Survey this course achieved 95% student satisfaction rate!

Wolverhampton has pioneered the use of interactive web-based forums for teaching and assessment. These activities have proved very popular with students.

Comments from our External Examiners on provision:

For English Language:

"I've read many good essays which show students' real engagement with module primary and secondary materials, which in turn suggest overall degree structures with decent breadth"

"Each module in Wolverhampton is assessed by more than one mode of assessment, allowing students to play to their strengths".

"All of these show good practice, real dedication to teaching on the tutors' behalf, and a great deal of effort going into the designing of modules, the setting of assignments, and the assessment of the submitted assignments".

"I particularly liked seeing innovative assessment methods … adjusted to the different kinds of student population".

For Linguistics:

“As always, I have found the marking consistent within individual modules and across modules. There is good evidence of a dialogue between first and second markers and my judgement has been sought in relation to one piece of assessed work. Markers provide extensive feedback which guides students towards addressing their weaknesses. What is also good practice is the provision of extensive notes within each assignment. Student work is of good quality with some very impressive independent research being carried out. The range of exam questions and essay topics is stimulating and reflects the high quality of the teaching".

The member of academic staff who lead this course is Deborah Orpin

On successful completion of this course you will be able to:

  • articulate orally and in writing knowledge of the forms and functions of English, and its use and variety in social and cultural contexts;
  • demonstrate creative thinking, critical analysis and the ability to construct a sustained and coherent argument orally and in writing;
  • demonstrate key employment skills (eg. self-management, IT, digital literacy, enterprise, working in groups).

Location Mode Fee Year
Home/EU Full-time £9250 per year 2019-20
Home/EU Full-time £9250 per year 2020-21
Home/EU Part-time £2975 per year# 2019-20
Home/EU Part-time £3050 per year# 2020-21
International Full-time £12000 per year 2019-20
International Full-time £12250 per year 2020-21
International Part-time £6000 per year# 2019-20
International Part-time £6125 per year# 2020-21

Additional Course Costs

Additional Field Trips

£100 - Subsidised trip to The Globe Theatre London

Further information on these additional costs will be provided prior to the start of your studies

The University is committed to a transparent fee structure, with no hidden costs, to help you make an informed decision. This includes information on what is included in the fee and how fees are calculated and reviewed

2020 Entry         

Typical entry requirement: 96 UCAS points

  • A Levels - grades CCC / BCD
  • BTEC L3 Extended Diploma or OCR Cambridge L3 Technical Extended Diploma - grades MMM
  • Access to HE Diploma: 45 L3 credits at Merit

Use the UCAS Tariff calculator to check your qualifications and points

Other Requirements

Students must usually have studied for a minimum of two years post GCSE level. However, we will consider applications from mature students who do not have two years of post-16 study, where they have relevant work experience. Please see http://wlv.ac.uk/mature for further information.

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“I truly enjoyed studying English Language and Linguistics as a Joint Honours Degree at the University of Wolverhampton. I have always been fascinated by languages, and by choosing this course I hoped to gain more understanding about […] how language works. The subject combination turned out to be a perfect match; it gave me a well-rounded insight into the theoretical aspects of language and at the same time I had ample opportunity to apply my newly acquired knowledge. During my course, I learned many new things about languages from all over the world and about English in particular. I would recommend this very well-balanced combination to anyone who is enthusiastic about languages”.

“I started Linguistics ‘blind’ without any previously teaching in the subject and no expectations as to what I would be learning or gaining from the experience. […] I have found every module stimulating. […] Students can apply their knowledge to their own native or second language.”

“The most important thing to note about the study of Linguistics is how much fun it can be.[…]The quality of teaching within Linguistics is excellent, with staff being extremely knowledgeable and enthusiastic, but also very supportive and approachable.”

"I thoroughly enjoyed learning about different languages and how they are developed, particaurly writing in phonemic script. The whole course has been fantastic, but my highlight has been graduating and being on stage to collect my degree!" - Katrina Dunbar 

The University also offers a range of Bursaries and Scholarships in addition to other financial support packages

Tuition Fees Loan: If you wish, you can take out a Government Student Loan which covers the full course fee. You pay it back once you’ve left university and your income is more than £25,725 (from April 2019). More information on repayments can be found at: repayments.
It’s available to eligible full-time higher education students and does not depend on family income.

The amount of the Tuition Fees Loan is paid directly to the University of Wolverhampton by the Student Loan Company.

Visit student finance on the gov.uk website to find out more.

Self-funding: If you don’t want to take out a loan to pay your fees, you might want to take advantage of the University’s scheme to pay by instalments: see How to Pay.The funding available to you depends on when you started your studies and if you have been to University previously.

For more information please contact the Gateway.

Financial Hardship: Students can apply to the Dennis Turner Opportunity Fund (https://www.wlv.ac.uk/study-here/money-matters/financial-support/dennis-turner-opportunity-fund/) for help with course related costs however this cannot be used for fees or to cover general living costs.

Telephone

01902 32 22 22

Email

enquiries@wlv.ac.uk

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