Dr David Jones, Faculty of Arts

Dr David JonesDavid Jones holds a PhD from Manchester Metropolitan University; his BA subjects were Philosophy and Literature, graduating from Warwick University. He is an elected Member of the International Academy of Ceramics and will represent the UK, Ireland and Benelux on the IAC Council from 2016-2022. He is a fellow of the Crafts Potter Association of England. Since 1987 he has been a senior lecturer at the University of Wolverhampton, UK, teaching on the BA and post-graduate programmes. 

The clay work has been predominantly in the field of raku-fired ceramics, resulting in deep-black, smoked surfaces with lustres; these have been exhibited as unique objects as well as installations using firing as a metaphor. This work has been underpinned by the authoring of two books: Firing – Philosophies within contemporary ceramic practice (2007) and Raku, Investigations into Fire, (1999).

This theoretical work has been extended through the presentation of papers to many international symposia. The recently completed PhD at Manchester Metropolitan University has led to work in new directions in installation practice, utilising the blackening and burning of ceramic surfaces to allude metaphorically to the elision between clay bodies, vessels and human bodies, bringing a  recognition of my identity as a 2nd. Generation Holocaust-survivor.

His ceramic work is held in many international collections including Boymans Van Beunigen, Rotterdam; FuLe International Museum of Ceramics , Fuping, Xian, China; Inax Gallery, Tokyo, Japan; Yingge Ceramics Museum, Taipei, Taiwan; Staatliches Museum für angwandte Kunst, Munchen, Germany.

Clay Bodies: An Exploration of the Possibilities that a Language of Ceramics Offers to Explore Meaning in Conflicted Histories

David Jones’ clay work has been predominantly in the field of raku-fired ceramics, resulting in deep-black, smoked surfaces with lustres; these have been exhibited as unique objects as well as installations using firing as a metaphor.

The recently completed PhD at Manchester Metropolitan University has led to work in new directions in installation practice, utilising the blackening and burning of ceramic surfaces to allude metaphorically to the elision between clay bodies, vessels and human bodies, bringing a new recognition of my identity as a 2nd. Generation Holocaust-survivor.

The interruption of the State bureaucracy in Leipzig will constitute a shelving system that echoes the stacked bunks of humans in the concentration camps. It will emphasise the role that advanced bureaucracy and division of labour played in the murder of 11 million people including 6 million Jews in the Holocaust. Items ot be placed on the shelves will be communally made in collaboration: with a public also including faith groups, refugees,