University of Wolverhampton City Campus

Your Study

This page has been created to ensure you get the best support available to you.  Here you’ll find support you never knew existed along with help you’ve always wanted.  

If you cannot find the right guidance here, or just aren’t sure what you need, click on Contact Us  to ensure that at least you can find someone to speak to who can point you in the right direction.

The main thing to remember is that you are not alone.  If in doubt, ask - no question is too small or too silly (and you probably won't be the first to ask it).

Other useful resources

In this section you will find other useful resources in a quick and easy way which will help and guide you through your university life. Simply click on the information you are interested in and it will open up a section on how to find out about it

Email

Use this link to access your university email account externally to the university.  If you log on to any university pc you will be able to use the shortcut on the desktop.

Also, you can forward your university emails to your personal email address by following the instructions via the IT Services webpage or by ringing (01902) 322000

Personal Tutor

When you join the University you will be given a Personal Tutor. This information can be found in your evision homepage. Your personal tutor is someone who can offer you guidance and advice, this could be about your course, and any other aspects that affect your study.   In order for personal tutoring to be a beneficial and meaningful relationship for you, you need to communicate with your personal tutor. 

Transnational & Research Students

The S.T.a.R Office was formed in April 2013 to offer a specialist service to an increasingly important part of the University student community:

  • TNE Students (those University of Wolverhampton students studying overseas either at a branch campus or partner institution)
  • Research Students (studying in the UK or overseas in their own country)
  • Students on a designated Distance Learning Course

My work is going to be late - what can I do?

If you experience an illness, or other serious personal difficulty, which prevents you from completing an assignment, you may request an extension to the submission deadline. A maximum of seven days’ extension will be granted if your claim is considered valid.

Where your illness, or personal difficulty, is so serious that you consider your performance in one or more modules has been affected, or you are unable to attend a formal examination, you should make a claim for extenuating circumstances. If your claim is accepted you will normally be offered the opportunity to take assessment as if for the first time (with no grade penalty) within the current year. 

Requests for extensions and extenuating circumstances are made via the Extenuating Circumstances & Assessment link through e:Vision and must normally be made before the assignment deadline. Retrospective applications will not be considered.

Your Student Centre has information on both these processes.

The Small Print

It is essential that you are familiar with the contents of the following pages which will provide useful and important information regarding your course. 

Using this guide

Some of this information will be more relevant as your studies progress, but reading it now will help you understand how the University works.

We need to point out though, that this guide does not include all the information you need to know about studying here; sometimes you will need to consult other sources of information like your course guides and the undergraduate regulations.

Sometimes the information will need to be updated, so you may want to consult the online version periodically, as well as systems such as e:Vision, making note of any changes and considering how they may affect your course.

 

“I was impressed with the standard of teaching, the way the subject was taught, and how approachable the lecturers were. Working and studying was tough at times but I had a lot of support from the University and made sure I planned ahead and organised my time well”

Gareth Hunt, Design Technology

 

Using this guide

Some of this information will be more relevant as your studies progress, but reading it now will help you understand how the University works.

We need to point out though, that this guide does not include all the information you need to know about studying here; sometimes you will need to consult other sources of information like your course guides and the postgraduate regulations.

Sometimes the information will need to be updated, so you may want to consult the online version periodically, as well as systems such as e:Vision, making note of any changes and considering how they may affect your course.

 

Introduction

The development of our Student Charter has been led primarily by the Students’ Union and informed by student views.  The Charter is subject to an annual review and this, the 2014-15 version, has been revised under the leadership of the Students’ Union.

The Charter is not a contract, nor is it intended to be legally binding; it is a set of shared expectations which establishes the values and standards we are seeking to promote across all of our learning community. We will continue to review the common principles in this Charter on an annual basis; regularly responding to your feedback in continuously improving our services and standards and challenged by an energetic and independent Students’ Union.

The Student Charter is the basis for both Course and Faculty Student Representative training and both the University and the Students’ Union are committed to communicating, promoting and delivering the principles set out in this document.

Higher education is a journey of creative and critical enquiry, where students, teachers and researchers learn together to develop new knowledge and professional skills. We hope that you enjoy your learning journey with us, a University to be proud of.

 

Geoff Layer, Vice-Chancellor & Zoe Harrison, President of the Students’ Union 2014-15

 Student Charter

  

The Charter seeks to apply to all students on all courses, wherever you study in the UK, and reflect our normal expectations of your experience at the University of Wolverhampton. On occasions different types of study and interactions will mean necessary variations from time to time

 

Academic Regulations

Undergraduate, Foundation, Taught Postgraduate and Professional Doctorate Regulations from September 2013.

There are three sets of Academic Regulations in force during 2013/14

  • One set governs courses running our new 20 credit module framework.
  • Another for courses running on the 15 credit structure
  • A third set covers Research Students.

 

Your Course Guide
(also known as subject or pathway guide)

Contains all the essential information you will need to understand how your chosen course operates.

Organised by year of academic entry, you can browse our course guides by the School that runs your course. You should also read your course guide in conjunction with our undergraduate student guide to know more about how the course will work.

 

Course Guides for 2014/15

Course Guides for 2015/16

The Conduct and Appeals Unit operates as part of the Office of the Dean of Students and is responsible for the development and implementation of University wide policies and procedures relating to Academic Misconduct, Student Conduct, Academic Appeals and Complaints.

Student life can be challenging, things don't always run smoothly and the role of Conduct and Appeals Unit is to ensure that, when things do go wrong, action is taken. This includes resolving Complaints and Academic Appeals and, where necessary, investigating and penalising student misconduct.

 

Conduct and Appeals Unit