Leonie Jackson PHD profile

Leonie Jackson

Course studied: PhD in Security Studies

Graduated: 2015

Current role: Full-time lecturer at the University of Huddersfield

My time at Wolverhampton was incredibly valuable, not only in terms of research, writing and time management skills, but also in learning the ropes of academia.

I developed a passion for security studies during my Masters degree and chose to continue my studies at Wolverhampton because I wanted to work under the supervision of Professor George Kassimeris, a leading expert in the field.

I completed my PhD in Security Studies in June 2015 and secured a full time lecturing job at the University of Huddersfield in January 2017, having worked as a research assistant and a sessional lecturer.  I developed a passion for the subject during my Masters degree and chose to continue my studies at Wolverhampton because I wanted to work under the supervision of Professor George Kassimeris, a leading expert in the field.     

My time at Wolverhampton was incredibly valuable, not only in terms of research, writing and time management skills, but also in learning the ropes of academia. My advice to those seeking an academic job would be to take all the opportunities that are offered and immerse yourself in the research culture. During my PhD I was able to present my research at staff conferences, organise an international conference, and attend a number of guest lectures delivered by experts in the field. I was also given the opportunity to teach undergraduate and postgraduate students, and this was vital for making my CV stand out as well as preparing me for the challenges of lecturing.

Among the most important skills I learned during my time at Wolverhampton was in writing and publishing. During my PhD I published a number of articles with my supervisor, and was mentored through the whole process of submission, revision and finally publication. I would strongly encourage PhD students to publish early and publish often. Although it can be tough to deal with the inevitable rejections, the re-drafting process will focus your research, ultimately leading to a better thesis, as well as helping you to gain a foothold in the wider research community.

I now split my time between teaching and research and my first book, a research monograph entitled Islamophobia in Britain: The making of a Muslim enemy, will be published in August 2017.