Research & Enterprise in Education, Health & Wellbeing

Funded Research Projects

CHSCI's multi disiplinary and thematic approach to research means that projects are commissioned from a variety of sources across the university, private and public sectors.

A selection of our current and recent projects are listed below:

Recognising the gift of organ and tissue donation: the views and preferences of donor families  

Project LeadCommissionerOverview

Professor Magi Sque

Dr Wendy Walker

Mr Benjamin Carpenter

NHS Trust Support: Ms Suzanne Roberts

Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust

Each year, thousands of lives are saved or transformed due to the contribution of organ and tissue donation. Honouring the gift of donation was endorsed in 2008 by the Department of Health Organ Donation Taskforce. A key recommendation was the need for research to establish the means of personal and public recognition that most donor families would appreciate. Locally, The Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust is considering funding a public memorial that would serve as recognition of donors’ and families’ contribution to society. This local study will use case study methodology, implemented via retrospective focus group discussions with adult bereaved family members, who agreed to organ and/or tissue donation from a deceased relative. The research team will also facilitate participation by offering families the choice of providing a written response. The study findings will make a unique and important contribution to understanding and representing donor families’ views, ideas and preferences regarding personal and public recognition, for use by stakeholders and beneficiaries. Reported findings will be used to inform the nature, design and location of a public memorial, in line with responses solicited from the study participants

Reasons for and implications of missed appointments (DNAs) in GP and dental surgeries in NHS Walsall: an evaluation

Project LeadCommissionerOverview

Dr Angela Morgan        

NHS Walsall Trust

The objectives of this study are to firstly establish current DNA rates in GP and dental practices across NHS Walsall; subsequently determine why patients miss booked appointments, evaluate the implications of DNAs in GP and dental practices for patient health and wellbeing and demand on services, and to provide recommendations for how DNA rates in GP and dental practices can be reduced.

Developing a multi-dimensional outcomes measurement model for children with complex needs in residential care

Project LeadCommissionerOverview

Dr Angela Morgan

KTP Associate: Jodie Freeman

KTP/Bryn Melyn Care This is the School of Health and Wellbeing’s Knowledge Transfer Partnership with Bryn Melyn Care. Operating in a niche market, Bryn Melyn Care is a provider of specialist placements that combine education, therapy and care for the most disadvantaged young people in the looked-after care system in the UK, approximately 600 young people. This three-year project aims to develop a multi-dimensional outcomes measurement model that is capable of bridging a sector-wide knowledge gap, underpinned by sociology, psychology, healthcare, and legal principles.

EU Comparative: counselling and psychotherapy for female and child victims of domestic violence

Project LeadCommissionerOverview

Dr Angela Morgan      

The Haven Wolverhampton/ Daphne III        

Despite growing data linking domestic abuse and poor mental health, there is little EU-wide evidence of the importance of NGO counselling and psychological provision for long-term recovery of victims. The Haven Wolverhampton is leading this two-year collaboration between the United Kingdom, Portugal, Germany, Latvia, Italy and the Netherlands, with financial support from the Daphne III Programme of the European Union.

 Building a culture of safety among independent contractors 

Project LeadCommissionerOverview

Professor Laura Serrant-Green

Dr Lesley Meeson

NHS Walsall               

Patient safety has always been at the heart of medical practice, with ‘first do no harm’ being the essence of the Hippocratic Oath. Independent contractors in primary care, otherwise known as General Practitioners, GPs or family doctors, provide more than 80% of NHS patient contact, in surgeries, in patients’ homes and other environments. This project, funded by NHS Walsall, looks at patient safety within general practice, the systems available for reporting adverse events, the barriers to such reporting and how a culture of safety might be facilitated among General Practitioners.

Rural-urban and geographic differences in prevalence, management and prognosis of dementia in China

Project LeadCommissionerOverview

Professor Ruoling Chen

Angela Clifford

BUPA Foundation         

This research is investigating the differences in the development, care and outcomes of dementia in rural and urban settings in China. Previous research has demonstrated that the progression of dementia in Western societies is closely related to risk factors such as low socio-economic status and depression; however, it is unclear whether these risk factors affect different populations in a similar way. To investigate this, a sample of people aged 60 years or older from five geographically different provinces in China have been interviewed and followed up over 18 months. Data analysis is ongoing with research outputs currently in preparation. The findings from this project have implications for public health and policy both on a local and international level.

Bereaved families’ experiences of organ and tissue donation, and perceived influences on their decision-making

Project LeadCommissionerOverview

Professor Magi Sque

Dr Wendy Walker

Department of Health                         

In 2008, the Organ Donation Taskforce recommended reorganization of donation services targeted to increase organ donation by 50% in five years (DH 2008). One of the factors impacting the achievement of this target will be the bereaved families’ consent to organ donation from a deceased relative. This national study will use grounded theory methodology, implemented via retrospective, cross-sectional qualitative interviews with 60 next-of-kin decision-makers, to generate rich, informative data as to why the bereaved agree or decline donation. Eligible participants will be recruited from five geographically diverse regions throughout England. The experiences of participants will be analysed using a comparative, thematic approach concerned with detecting and highlighting important similarities and differences between accounts. The study is expected to provide a rationale for further preparation of professionals involved in this sensitive work, and the voluntary organisations that seek to support families and professionals involved in the donation process. The study has the potential to increase organ and tissue availability by contributing to further understanding of the donation process.