Your modules

Modules are blocks of teaching and learning around a particular theme. Although modules focus on specific topics, the knowledge and experiences you gain in one module will be applicable to all other modules you are studying.

THERE ARE DIFFERENT TYPES OF MODULES

Module learning outcomes show you what you will be able to do when you successfully pass a module. Each module will contain one or more assessment activities, designed to ensure that you have an opportunity to demonstrate that you have met the learning outcomes for that module. The assessment brief (see the section on ‘Assessment’) will indicate which learning outcomes are being addressed.

 
 
 
From your school or college experiences, you may be used to working in small groups and being closely monitored by your tutors; however, this is less common in higher education, particularly on courses with large numbers of students. 
 
You will be expected to do additional studies in order to enhance your prospects of getting higher marks and grades. Another difference of higher education is that attendance at timetabled sessions will not guarantee a high result in your assessment tasks. You will be expected to do additional studies in order to enhance your prospects of getting higher marks and grades. The aim of timetabled sessions is to introduce you to new ideas and concepts, which you can study further in your own time – known as 
‘independent learning’. 
 
Additional resources will be highlighted as part of your module that will help you to find additional information for your independent learning but you will need to use, and develop, your organisational skills to engage fully with your course. 
 
Different modules will use a range of approaches to engage you with your studies. These approaches may include some of the following: