Plenary Speakers

Paul Rock, Professor Emeritus at the London School of Economics

Paul Rock has been Emeritus Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics since 2008. He took his first degree at LSE and then a DPhil at Nuffield College, University of Oxford.  He is the author of several books and articles, principally on criminal justice policy-making but also on developments in criminological theory, and is currently working with David Downes and Tim Newburn on the official history of criminal justice.  He has been a visiting professor at a number of universities in North America, the most recent being the University of Pennsylvania; a visiting scholar at the Ministry of the Solicitor General of Canada; a fellow of the Center for the Advanced Study of the Behavioral Sciences in Stanford, California; and a fellow at REGNET, Australian National University where he is now an honorary fellow. He is also a fellow of the British Academy and of the Royal Society of Arts.

Yvonne Jewkes earned her PhD in Criminology from the University of Cambridge and is currently Professor of Criminology at the University of Leicester.  Her books include Media and Crime, Handbook on Prisons, Captive Audience: Media, Masculinity and Power in Prisons, Crime Online and Dot.cons: Crime, Deviance and the Internet. She is editor of the Sage book series Key Approaches to Criminology and, with Ben Crewe and Thomas Ugelvik, is series editor of Palgrave Studies in Prisons and Penology.  Yvonne was one of the founding editors of the journal Crime, Media, Culture, winner of the 2006 Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers’ Charlesworth Award for Best New Journal. 

Participants in Criminology on Trial

Presenting the case for the Prosecution:

Professor Steve Tombs took up the post of Professor of Criminology at the Open University in 2013. Prior to that he had been Professor of Sociology at Liverpool John Moores University. He has a long-standing interest in the incidence, nature and regulation of corporate crime, and in particular the regulation and management of health and safety at work. His publications include Regulatory Surrender: death, injury and the non-enforcement of law (Institute of Employment Rights, 2010) A Crisis of Enforcement: the decriminalisation of death and injury at work (Centre for Crime and Justice Studies, 2008) and Safety Crimes (Willan, 2007), all co-authored with Dave Whyte. He co-edited:State, Power, Crime (Sage, 2009); with Dave Gordon, Paddy Hillyard and Christina Pantazis, Beyond Criminology? Taking Harm Seriously (Pluto Press, 2004) and Criminal Obsessions (Crime and Society Foundation, 2005, 2008); and Unmasking the Crimes of the Powerful: scrutinising states and corporations, with  Dave Whyte (Peter Lang, 2003). He is co-author of Corporate Crime (Longman, 1999), with Gary Slapper, and Toxic Capitalism (Ashgate, 1998, Canadian Scholars' Press, 1999), with Frank Pearce. He also co-authored People in Organisations (Blackwell, 1996) and co-edited Risk, Management and Society (Kluwer-Nijhoff, 2000). He works closely with the Hazards movement in the UK, and was Chair of the Chair of the Centre for Corporate Accountability, 1999-2009.

Steve Tombs took up the post of Professor of Criminology at the Open University in 2013. Prior to that he had been Professor of Sociology at Liverpool John Moores University. He has a long-standing interest in the incidence, nature and regulation of corporate crime, and in particular the regulation and ‘management’ of health and safety at work, and has published widely on these matters. He works closely with the Hazards movement in the UK, and was Chair of the Chair of the Centre for Corporate Accountability, 1999-2009.

 

Presenting the case for the Defence:

Professor Loraine Gelsthorpe, President of the British Society of Criminology, is Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice and Director of the M.Phil Programmes at the Institute of Criminology, University of Cambridge, where she has worked since 1991.   She has carried out a number of research studies since the mid-1980s, including work on police decision-making with regard to juvenile offenders; the operation of multi-agency juvenile panels; the role of the Crown Prosecution Service in juvenile justice; gender issues in juvenile justice; the theory, policy and practice of attendance centres; the treatment of fine defaulters in magistrates’ courts, and race and gender issues in social inquiry reports.   She has also conducted research on inter-agency aspects of crime prevention, pre-sentence reports, the sentencing of women, and community service orders (unpaid work) as a requirement of a Community Order.

Current research interests revolve around women and criminal justice (including the criminalisation of migrant women), probation practice in late modernity, youth justice issues, and more broadly, notions of criminal and social justice in sentencing and the development of criminological and social theories in their social and political context since 1945.  Empirical work includes a focus on resettlement issues for women – particularly those connected to housing.  Loraine maintains a strong interest in methodological issues (particularly psychoanalytical dimensions of the research process).

Loraine is a former ESRC Training Board Member and member of the 2008 RAE sub-panel and 2014 REF panel on Social Policy and Social Work and Administration.

In her spare time (!) she is a practising psychoanalytical psychotherapist, plays the viola, and manages two delinquent cats.

Witnesses for the Prosecution:

Paddy Hillyard is Emeritus Professor of Sociology at Queen’s University Belfast. He has a range of research interests including social order and control, social harm, political violence, poverty and inequality. His past research has explored the changing strategies used to deal with political violence in Northern Ireland and Britain.  More recently his research has focused on poverty, conflict and inequality in Northern Ireland. Along with colleagues, he is involved in developing a new discipline, Zemiology (from the Greek zemia), focusing on the study of the range of the social harms which people experience from the cradle to the grave, only a small proportion of which are captured by the criminal law.

Dr Simon Pemberton is a Birmingham Fellow based in the Schools of Law and Social Policy at the University of Birmingham.  His research to date encompasses three inter-related areas: social harm, crime and criminalisation: state and corporate harm; poverty, inequality and human rights.

Simon completed his PhD in 2004, 'The Production of Harm in the UK: A social harm analysis' at the University of Bristol. In 2005, he was awarded an ESRC Post Doctoral Fellowship The Human Wreckage of Neo Liberalism: A social harm perspective’ to develop his doctoral work on social harm. He has published a widely on the notion of social harm and the zemiological perspective, including: ‘Criminal obsessions: Why harm matters more than crime’ (Dorling et al, 2008); 'Nation States and the Production of Social Harm: Resisting the Hegemony of 'TINA (with Pantazis, 2009); 'Social harm future(s): Exploring the potential of the social harm approach' (2007); and, ‘A Theory of Moral Indifference: Understanding the production of harm by capitalist society’ (2004).  He is currently completing a monograph for The Policy Press, entitled Harmful Societies, with planned publication in 2014.

 

 

Witnesses for the Defence:

Professor Shadd Maruna is the Director of the Institute of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Queen’s University Belfast and the inaugural winner of the Research Medal from the Howard League for Penal Reform in 2011. His most recent book is Fifty Key Thinkers in Criminology (with Keith Hayward and Jayne Mooney).

Coretta Phillips is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Social Policy at the London School of Economics and Political Science. She has published extensively in the field of ethnicity, crime and criminal justice, including in three editions of the Oxford Handbook of Criminology. She is the author of The Multicultural Prison: Ethnicity, Masculinity, and Social Relations among Prisoners (Oxford University Press 2012) and co-author of Racism, Crime and Justice (Longman 2002) and is currently co-editing a book entitled New Directions in Race, Ethnicity and Crime. She has been at the LSE since 2001. Previous positions include Assistant Professor, Rutgers School of Criminal Justice and Principal Research Officer at the Home Office Research, Development and Statistics group.