Staff Profile: Penny Welch

Name
Penny Welch
Title
Principal Lecturer in Learning and Teaching
Research DepartmentConvenor of Pedagogic Research Cluster
Subject AreaPolitics and History
Tel.01902 322456
Email
 
 

Summary

Penny Welch has spent most of her teaching career at Wolverhampton and she is now a Principal Lecturer in Learning and Teaching.

She has been co-editor of Learning and Teaching: the International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences and its predecessor LATISS – Learning and Teaching in the Social Sciences since 2003.

She is active in the University and College Union (UCU) and she was Vice Chair and Chair of its West Midlands Region from 2006 to 2012.

Current Modules Taught

  • 3GK007 Wolverhampton and its people
  • 4GK005 Campaigning and Citizenship: Women in Britain and its Empire from 1800 to 1950
  • 4MZ010 Media, Politics and Power
  • 5PO005 Europe United: European Politics, Societies, Cultures
  • 6SL008 Globalisation: struggles and resistance
  • 6CJ010 Contemporary Issues in Transnational Organised Crime
  • 6PO003 Political Theory
  • 7SL005 Critical study of community or professional role
  • 7SL006 Evaluation of community or professional practice

Research Interests

  • Feminist Pedagogy
  • Learning and Teaching in Higher Education
  • Higher Education Policy
  • Equality and Diversity

Membership of Professional Bodies

Awards

  • Higher Education Academy Subject Centre for Sociology, Anthropology and Politics (C-SAP) Award 2005 for Outstanding Contribution to Learning and Teaching in the Social Sciences
  • Higher Education Academy Subject Centre for Sociology, Anthropology and Politics (C-SAP) Director's Recognition Award 2011 for Social Science Learning and Teaching Publication (with Susan Wright, Danish School of Education, University of Århus)

Main Publications

  • ‘Thinking about Teaching Politics Revisited’, in S. Lightfoot and C. Gormley-Heenan Teaching Politics, Palgrave Macmillan 2012.
  • ‘The evolution of government policy towards English higher education 1979-2007’, Learning and Teaching: the International Journal of Higher Education in the Social Sciences, 2(2): 96–122, 2009 http://berghahn.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/berghahn/latiss
  • ‘Reclaiming higher education as a public good: teaching for social justice through feminist pedagogy’, in M. Todd and M. Alcala (eds) (2008) Teaching in Public – the Future of Higher Education?
  • Proceedings of the November 2007 C-SAP Conference, Birmingham: The Centre for Sociology, Anthropology and Politics (C-SAP), pp. 99-108.
  • ‘Feminist pedagogy revisited’, LATISS - Learning and Teaching in the Social Sciences, 3(3): 171-199, December 2006 http://www.intellectbooks.co.uk/journals/view-Article,id=5975/
  • ‘Feminist pedagogy and power in the academy’ in G. Howie and A. Tauchert (eds) (2002) Gender, Teaching and Research in Higher Education, London: Ashgate.
  • ‘Thinking about teaching Politics’, Politics, 20(2): 99-104, May 2000 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9256.00118/abstract
  • ‘The politics of teaching Women’s Studies’, Women’s Studies Quarterly, 27(3 & 4): 70-76, Fall/Winter 1999.
  • ‘Key skills and the teaching of Politics’, European Consortium of Political Research News, Autumn 1999.
  • ‘What can tutors and students do to promote egalitarian relationships in the Women's Studies classroom?’ in F. Montgomery and C. Collette (eds) (1997) Into the Melting Pot: Women's Studies in the New Millennium, Aldershot: Ashgate.
  • ‘Is a feminist pedagogy possible?’ in Sue Davies, Cathy Lubelska and Jocey Quinn (eds) (1994) Changing the Subject: Women in Higher Education, London: Taylor and Francis.

Conference Papers (Recent)

  • ‘Student-centred teaching and learning in a marketised higher education system’, invited paper at Political Studies Association and British International Studies Association Teaching and Learning Group Conference, Cardiff, September 2011.
  • ‘Innovative curriculum design’, 3rd Political Studies Association Teaching and Learning Group Conference, Leicester, September 2010.
  • ‘Hollowing out the university: the impact of quality processes on higher education institutions and on the everyday lives of academics’, invited contribution to the Political Economy of University Governance conference, University of Birmingham, June 2010.
  • ‘Feminist pedagogy in the Politics classroom’, Political Studies Association Annual Conference, Edinburgh, March 2010 http://www.psa.ac.uk/
  • ‘What can tutors do to create an open and inclusive classroom atmosphere in higher education today?’, Higher Education Academy Subject Centre for Sociology, Anthropology and Politics (C-SAP) Conference, Birmingham, November 2009.
  • ‘Thinking about teaching Politics in the twenty-first century’, invited conference paper at 2nd Political Studies Association Teaching and Learning Group Conference, Leeds, September 2009.
  • ‘Lecturing and Small Group Teaching’, workshop at Early Career and Refreshers Event For Politics Teaching Staff, HEA Subject Centre for Sociology, Anthropology and Politics (C-SAP), Cardiff, February 2008.