Name Professor James Z Tang
Job Title Professor in Pharmaceutics
Faculty Faculty of Science and Engineering
School School of Pharmacy
Subject(s) Pharmacy
Tel +44 (0) 1902 32 2080
Email j.z.tang@wlv.ac.uk

James Tang‌‌

James officially joined the University of Wolverhampton in September 2008 from Keele University, where he held the position of Senior Ranking Research Fellow in a multi-million Euros adventure consortium with German, Dutch, and UK partners under the support of SIXTH FRAMWORK PROGRAMME: New and emerging science and technologies (NEST)- FP6-NEST-2006-INTEFRATING Grant agreement number: 28861.

 

James has over 25 years experience in higher education and 4 years in a R&D institution. James has established excellent connections and a rich history of successful activities involving external academic institutions, healthcare service, and industrial/commercial organisations. In 1998, James became Project Manager in Polymer Processing Group at Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology, dealing with surface adhesion related industrial projects resulting one patent. James received annual achievement award in 2000 and initiated a pioneer program of 3D printing with Singapore University Hospital and Private Company in 2001. When James was at UK Centre for Tissue Engineering, a 10 million Interdisciplinary Research Collaboration (IRcol) between University of Liverpool and University of Manchester under the support of the Research Councils (BBSRC, MRC, EPSRC), James was invited on behalf of UK Centre for Tissue Engineering giving a short course on Nanoscience and Tissue Engineering, in iNanoSchool, Autumn School 2005, at Fuglsøcentret, University of Aarhus, Denmark, in 2005. Being a specialist in biomaterials, James initiated a FP7 Marie Curie IRSES exchange programme of Hyanji Scaffold at Keele University in 2008, participating in the programme as an honorary senior lecturer since 2009. In 2011, James initiated another Marie Curie FP7 IRSES exchange programme of Heptag Exchange at the University of Wolverhampton and then first FP7 Marie Curie Incoming Fellowship with colleague in 2013. James was appointed Professor in Pharmaceutics in 2014. Under James’ directorship, Cancer Targeted Delivery Initiative was formed in 2012 and joint Nanomedicine program with Keele University was activated in 2016.

 

James was board director of Academy of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Great Britain from 2010 to 2014. James is also a Guest Professor at Sichuan University, China Since 2008; Editorial Board for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Letter, USA from 2008 to 2012; an honorary senior lecturer at Keele University, UK since 2009; Expert Evaluator for Horizon 2020 Marie Sklodowska-Curie Action-RISE since 2014; and Guest Editor for Materials Special Issue: Materials for Drug Delivery and Pharmaceutical Considerations in 2016~17.

 

James is author and co-author of over 70 publications and 3 book chapters, filed 6 patents, and delivered over 13 presentations nationally and internationally. 

James has experience in the following expertise areas:

1)      Targeted drug delivery

2)      Drug Formulation

3)      Particulate Delivery Systems

4)      Nanotechnology

5)      Pharnaceutical materials

6)      Separation and extraction

7)      Pharmaceutical analysis

8)      Biomaterials and tissue regeneration

Research Interests

James’s research interests are in the areas but not limited to the areas of:

1)      Targeted drug delivery

Passive and active targeting approaches individually and/or combination are attempted, passive targeting aiming at particle size and pH control through vehicle design and characterisation and active targeting aiming at ligand identification and conjugation. Collaboration with oncologist for specific cancer studies involving in-vitro cancer cell and in-vivo animal models. Sampler publications can be found on Heptag Exchange website: http://heptagexchange.wlv.ac.uk/publications.php

2)      Drug Formulation

Sustained release tablets are prepared by formulation of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) with cellulose ethers. API content in tablet is quantified using HPLC or UV Vis analysis. Sustained release profile is analysed in dissolution apparatus according to British Pharmacopoeia.

3)      Particulate Delivery Systems

Particulate delivery systems are prepared using emulsion method. Polycaprolactone is a typical vehicle material in forming microspheres for API encapsulation. Polyester is another vehicle material for growth factor release. 

4)      Nanotechnology

Amphiphilic block polymer or dendrimer are prepared and self-assembled nanoparticles are formed for passive and pH controlled targeted delivery of Doxorubicin.  Sampler publications can be found on Heptag Exchange website: http://heptagexchange.wlv.ac.uk/publications.php

5)      Biomaterials and tissue regeneration

Polyester encapsulated growth factor is embedded in collagen gel matrix to achieve sustained release of growth factor stimulating sustained cell and tissue regeneration. Sampler publications can be found on Hyanji Scaffold website: https://www.keele.ac.uk/hyanjiscaffold/publications/

6)   Pharmaceutical materials

Pharmaceutical materials from natural and man-made resources are considered and evaluated. Hybrid materials are synthesized through grafting for targeted delivery purpose.

7)   Separation and extraction

Nanomaterials and nanotechnology are incorporated in separation and extraction of active pharmaceutical ingredients in herb resources.

8)   Pharmaceutical analysis

Analytical methods and protocols are set up for quality control purpose. Regulatory considerations are also introduced for quality assurance requirements

 

 

Member in the Academy of Pharmaceutical Sciences in Great Britain (APSGB)

Active member in International Society of Biomaterials

Fellow of the HEA (High Education Academy) in the UK

Member in Regional Society for Biomedical Engineering, Singapore

Member in Regional Society for Biomedical Engineering, China 

Editor for special Issue in Materials, the Journal and the title of the special issue "Materials for Drug Delivery and Biomedical Consideration", http://www.mdpi.com/journal/materials/special_issues/materials_drug_delivery_biomedical_consideration

Publications

 

Selected journal publications:

 

  • Zhang W, She X, Wang L, Fan H, Zhou Q, Huang X, Tang JZ (2017) Preparation, Characterization and Application of a Molecularly Imprinted Polymer for Selective Recognition of Sulpiride. Materials 10(5): 475 (17 pages). doi:10.3390/ma10050475 (IF:3.300)
  • Mohamed Wali AR, Zhou J, Ma S, He Y, Yue D,Tang JZ, Gu Z. (2017) Tailoring the supramolecular structure of amphiphilic glycopolypeptide analogue toward liver targeted drug delivery systems. Int J Pharm. 525(1):191-202. doi: 10.1016/j.ijpharm.2017.04.009. (IF:4.428)
  • He Y, Zhou J, Ma S, Nie Y, Yue D, Jiang Q, Mohamed Wali AR, Tang JZ, Gu Z (2016Multi-Responsive “Turn-On” Nanocarriers for Efficient Site-Specific Gene Delivery In Vitro and In Vivo, Advanced Healthcare Materials, 26 September 2016, DOI: 10.1002/adhm.201600710 (IF:5.790)
  • Pu L, Wang J, Li N, Chai Q, Irache JM, Wang G, Tang JZ, Gu Z (2016) Synthesis of Electroneutralized Amphiphilic Copolymers with Peptide Dendrons for Intramuscular Gene Delivery. ACS Applied Materials & Interface Publication date (Web): May 16, 2016 DOI: 10.1021/acsami.6b02592 (IF:6.723).
  • Huarte J, Espuelas S, Lai Y, He B, Tang JZ, Irache JM (2016) Oral delivery of camptothecin using cyclodextrin/poly(anhydride) nanoparticles, International Journal of Pharmaceutics, 506: 116-128 doi:10.1016/j.ijpharm.2016.04.045 (IF: 3.65)
  • Zhang W, Liu X, Fan H, Zhu D, Wu X, Huang X, Tang JZ (2016) Separation and purification of alkaloids from Sophora flavescens Ait. by focused microwave-assisted aqueous two-phase extraction coupled with reversed micellar extraction, Industrial Crops and Products 86: 231–238 doi:10.1016/j.indcrop.2016.03.052 (IF: 2.837)
  • Chen Z, Zhang W,Tang X, Fan H, Xie X, Wan Q, Wu X, Tang JZ (2016) Extraction and characterisation of polysaccharides from Semen Cassiae by microwave-assisted aqueous two-phase extraction coupled with spectroscopy and HPLC, Carbohydrate Polymers 144: 263-270 doi:10.1016/j.carbpol.2016.02.063 (IF: 4.074)
  • Ma S, Zhou J, Mohamed Wali AR, He Y, Xu X, Tang JZ, Gu Z (2015) Self-assembly of pH-sensitive fluorinated peptide dendron functionalized dextran nanoparticles for on-demand intracellular drug delivery. J Mater Sci: Mater Med 26(8):219 DOI 10.1007/s10856-015-5550-z (IF: 2.587)
  • Yang Y, Li N, Nie Y, Sheng M, Yue D, Wang G, Tang JZ, Gu Z (2015) Folate-modified poly(malic acid) graft polymeric nanoparticles for targeted delivery of doxorubicin: synthesis, characterisation and folate receptor expressed cell specificity. J Biomed Nanotech 11: 1628-1639  doi:10.1166/jbn.2015.2132 (IF: 5.338)
  • Chen Z, Zhang W, Wang L, Fan H, Wan Q, Wu X, Tang X, Tang JZ (2015) Enantioseparation of racemic flurbiprofen by aqueous two-phase extraction with binary chiral selectors of L-dioctyl tartrate and L-tryptophan, Chirality 27(9): 650-657. DOI: 10.1002/chir.22481 (IF: 1.886)
  • Zhang W, Zhu D, Fan H, Liu X, Wan Q, Wu X, Liu P, Tang JZ (2015) Simultaneous extraction and purification of alkaloids from Sophora Flavescens Ait. by microwave-assisted aqueous two-phase extraction with ethanol/ammonia sulfate system. Separation and Purification Technology 141:113-123 doi:10.1016/j.seppur.2014.11.014 (IF: 3.523)
  • Dong CL, Webb WR, Peng Q, Tang JZ, Forsyth NR, Chen GQ, El Haj AJ (2015) Sustained PDGF-BB release from PHBHHx loaded nanoparticles in 3D hydrogel/stem cell model. J Biomed Mater Res Part A 103A: 282-288 doi: 10.1002/jbm.a.35149. (IF: 2.840)
  • Liu P, Wang Z, Brown S, Kannappan V, Tawari PE, Jiang W, Irache JM, Tang JZ, Armesilla AL, Darling JL, Tang X, Wang W (2014) Liposome encapsulated Disulfiram inhibits NFκB pathway and targets breast cancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. Oncotarget 5(17):7471-85 (IF: 6.63)
  • Liu P, Kumar IS, Brown S, Kannappan V, Tawari PE, Tang JZ, Jiang W, Armesilla AL, Darling JL, Wang W (2013) Disulfiram targets cancer stem-like cells and reverses resistance and cross-resistance in acquired paclitaxel-resistant triple-negative breast cancer cells. Br J Cancer 109(7):1876-85. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2013.534 (IF: 5.082)
  • Lai K, Jiang W, Tang JZ, Wu Y, He B, Wang G, Gu ZW (2012) Superparamagnetic nano-composite scaffolds for promoting bone cell proliferation and defect reparation without a magnetic field, RSC Advances 2(33):13007-13017 (DOI:10.1039/C2RA22376G) (IF: 2.56)
  • Liu R, He B, Li D, Lai Y, Tang JZ, Gu Z. (2012) Stabilization of pH-sensitive mPEG-PH-PLA nanoparticles by stereocomplexation between enantiomeric polylactides. Macromol Rapid Commun. 33(12): 1061-1066 (DOI:10.1002/marc.201100854 ) (IF:4.929)
  • Liu R, He B, Li D, Lai Y, Chang J, Tang JZ, Gu Z. (2012) Effects of pH-sensitive chain length on release of doxorubicin from mPEG-b-PH-b-PLLA nanoparticles. Int J Nanomedicine. 7: 4433-4446 (DOI:10.2147/IJN.S32053)(IF:3.463)
  • Liu R, He B, Li D, Lai Y, Tang JZ, Gu Z (2012) Synthesis and characterization of poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(L-histidine)-b-poly(L-lactide) with pH Sensitivity, Polymer 53 (7): 1473-1482 (DOI: 10.1016 /j.polymer.2012.02.013) (IF: 3.968)
  • Yu Z, He B, Long C, Liu R, Sheng M, Wang G, Tang JZ, Gu Z (2012) Synthesis, characterization, and drug delivery of amphiphilic poly{(lactic acid)-co-[(glycolic acid)-alt-(L-glutamic acid)]}-g-poly(ethylene glycol), Macromolecular Res 20(3) 250-258 (DOI: 0.1007/s13233-012-0055-9) (IF:1.639)
  • Dong CL, Li SY, Wang Y, Dong Y, Tang JZ, Chen JC, Chen GQ (2012) The cytocompatability of polyhydroxyalkanoates coated with a fusion protein of PHA repressor protein (PhaR) and Lys-Gln-Ala-Gly-Asp-Val (KQAGDV) polypeptide, Biomaterials 33(9): 2593-2599 (DOI: 10.1016 / j.biomaterials. 2011.12.020) (IF:7.883)
  • Liang Z, Gong T, Sun X, Tang JZ, Zhang Z (2011) Chitooligosaccharides as drug carriers for renal delivery of zidovudine, Carbohydrate Polymer  87(3):2284-2290 (DOI:10.1016/j.carbpol.2011.10.060) (IF: 3.479)
  • Tang JZ, Naqvi Z, Akhtar N, Ali S, Wang W (2010) The effect of solvents on the morphologies of disulfiram copper (II) complex, Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology  62(10):1354-1355 (IF:2.033)
  • Curran JM, Tang ZG, Hunt JA (2009) PLGA doping of PCL affects the plastic potential of human mesenchymal stem cells, both in the presence and absence of biological stimuli, Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A 89A (1), 1-12 (IF: 3.044)

 

 

1. Programmes

1.1 Joint Nanomedicine Programme

The new joint nanomedicine programme established from a multi-million Euros adventure consortium (MyJoint) (NEST)- FP6-NEST-2006-INTEFRATING Grant agreement number: 28861 and two FP7 platform projects (Hyanji Scaffold) PIRSES-GA-2008-230791 and (Heptag Exchange) FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IRSES-295218

Since the medical exploitation of anesthesia in 1846, cancer treatment took approaches to removal, kill, control, detection and prevention from tissue to cell level in consideration. Nanotechnology emerges as an important technique to miniaturising drug delivery systems further down to nanoscale. To achieve the precision in delivery and maximisation in efficacy of the active pharmaceutical ingredients, nano-carriers are prepared with an ensured long blood circulation, small enough for passive targeting to tumour tissue and active targeting to and through cancer cell membrane. The exemplar PhD projects are multidisciplinary in nature, falling into the areas of targeted drug delivery, pharmaceutical materials, and nanotechnology. The potential PhD projects can be categorised as:

  • Particulate delivery systems by exploiting functionalised polymers such as amphiphilic polymers for micelle formation
  • Nanoparticles such as magnetic iron oxide for cancer diagnosis (MRI imaging) and treatment (hyperthermia treatment)
  • Bioconjugation of tumour targeting ligands for active targeting consideration (imaging and treatment)

Entry requirement: minimum entry qualification – an Honours degree at 2:1 or above (or international equivalent) in chemical engineering, chemistry, materials science, pharmaceutical science and pharmacy, biomedical engineering, or cell biology. English language requirements need to be satisfied by EU/Overseas applicants. Candidates with passion and dedication are considered extensive training nationally and internationally.

 

1.2 Joint Pharmaceutical Materials Programme

The existing pharmaceutical materials programme established from a multi-million research programme of UK Centre for Tissue Engineering supported by BBSRC, EPSRC and MRC and two FP7 platform projects of Hyanji Scaffold and Heptag Exchange from 2002 to 2015.

Biomaterials can be categorised as degradable and non-degradable materials in biological and biomedical applications. Biomimetics can be prepared from biomaterials and be in 0D, 1D, 2D, and 3D spatial layouts through micro-assembly to macro-integration. The process can be guided and self-oriented using internal cohesive force and external stimuli. Exemplar cases are FDA approved liposomal Doxil, the nanodrug (1995) and the titanium 3D printed prosthetic jaw in surgery (2015).

The Joint Pharmaceutical Materials Programme has three distinctive directions, namely Nanopharmaceutics, Solid Dispersion and Implants & Devices. The potential PhD projects can becategorised as:

  • Particulate delivery systems by exploiting functionalised polymers such as amphiphilic polymers for micelle formation
  • Formulation of potent and insoluble drugs for sustained release such as growth factor release for tissue regeneration
  • Exploitation of 3D Printing for multiple drugs co-release and delayed release

Entry requirement: minimum entry qualification – an Honours degree at 2:1 or above (or international equivalent) in chemical engineering, chemistry, materials science, pharmaceutical science and pharmacy, biomedical engineering, or cell biology. English language requirements need to be satisfied by EU/Overseas applicants. Candidates with passion and dedication are considered extensive training nationally and internationally.

 

1.3 Joint Pharmaceutical Analysis Programme

The existing pharmaceutical analysis programme established from two FP7 platform projects of Hyanji Scaffold and Heptag Exchange providing capacity and strength from the existing research innovative network for student and staff exchange since 2009

High-resolution analytical techniques used for pharmaceutical excipients include spectroscopy, calorimetry, X-Ray Diffraction, Moisture sorption/desorption isotherms and chromatography. This program aims for quality control of the samples prepared from formulation or natural resources with interest in developing online process design, monitoring and control based on the entrance qualifications of the candidates. The program has distinctive areas of separation and extraction, pharmaceutical analysis, pharmaceutical materials, nanotechnology, and their combination. The potential PhD projects can becategorised as:

  • Quality control of herbal medicine in consideration of nanomaterials and nanotechnology for pharmaceutical separation and extraction
  • Quality control of pharmaceutical excipients for optimisation of formulation and its process

Entry requirement: minimum entry qualification – an Honours degree at 2:1 or above (or international equivalent) in chemical engineering, chemistry, materials science, pharmaceutical science and pharmacy, biomedical engineering, or cell biology. English language requirements need to be satisfied by EU/Overseas applicants. Candidates with passion and dedication are considered extensive training nationally and internationally.

 

Director of Studies: Professor James Z Tang supported with academic members and institutions in the Joint Programme under the umbrella of global training scheme

 

  1. 2.      Globalised Training Scheme

The existing training scheme established from two FP7 platform projects of Hyanji Scaffold and Heptag Exchange providing capacity and strength for young and experience researchers developing transferable skills for life-long learning, employment, R&D activities, and social activities as well. The training scheme delivers personalised training arrangement through remote online and one to one face to face extensive training by projects, tasks, and activities. It is a comprehensive deliverables aimed and focused training with practice in task and time management

  1. 3.       Completion of PhD Programmes

PhD candidates after the personalised training scheme have the opportunities to join the ongoing research innovative network for student exchange. Normally candidates joining our training scheme internally through undergraduate projects or externally/internationally through our existing research innovative network will have a fast route to completion.

Examples of Recently Completed PhD Programmes

Two examples are from the two FP7 platform projects of Hyanji Scaffold and Heptag Exchange

 

  • Skeletal muscular gene delivery system based on novel amphiphilic peptide dendrimers
  • Novel sustained and controlled insulin release system based on a biodegradable and biocompatible polyester PHBHHx