Dr Alison Attrill-Smith

Senior Lecturer

Email address: A.Attrill@wlv.ac.uk Phone number: 01902 322937 Location: MC323 Faculty: Faculty of Education Health and Wellbeing School/Institute: Institute of Sport and Human Sciences Areas of expertise: .

About

Background

Having completed her undergraduate degree at Birkbeck College, University of London, Dr Alison Attrill completed a PhD in Social Cognition at St Andrews University, prior to taking up a position as an ESRC Research Fellow at St Andrews. Subsequently Alison spent 7 years at De Montfort University where she became particularly interested in understanding the social behaviour of people online.  Seeing this as an extension of offline social cognitive behaviour, Dr Alison Attrill is now predominantly interested in how people construct their self online.  This includes all aspects of online behaviour, but particularly platonic and romantic relationships as well as functional relationships online. Her other interests lie in the area of online crime, in particular understanding perpetrator behaviour online.  Editor of the core text Cyberpsychology and author of the Palgrave Pivot Series Title The Manipulation of Online Self-Presentation: Create, Edit, Re-edit and Present, Alison is currently involved in a number of research projects including work exploring the understanding of Catfishing, trust and privacy concerns online, the perceived realness and consequences of online behaviour for individuals’ offline worlds, cyberbullying in the workplace and many more exciting areas of research.

Publications

Articles

Attrill, A. (2014). The misconception of online splurging and associated security Risks.  Cybertalk, UK.

Attrill, A., & Rai, R. (2014). The effects of synchronous and asynchronous Internet communication, personality, and representations of the self on the uptake of online video communication. Defence Science & Technology Laboratory.

Scase, M.O., Hall, J., & Attrill, A. (2014). Users’ reactions to failures and frustrations within cyber environments. Defence Science & Technology Laboratory.

Hadlington, L.J., Attrill, A., and Scase, M.O. (2013). Cognitive and behavioural concepts of cyber activities: Information processing of online content. Defence Science & Technology Laboratory.

Attrill, A., & Jalil, R. (2011). Revealing only the superficial me: Exploring categorical self-disclosure online. Computers in Human Behavior, 27, 1634-1642.

Attrill, A. (2012). Sharing only parts of me: categorical self-disclosure across Internet Arenas. International Journal of Internet Science, 7(1), 55-77.

Books 

Attrill. A. (Ed.) (2015). Cyberpsychology, OUP, England.

Attrill, A. (Ed.) (2015). The Manipulation of Online Self-Presentation: Create, Edit, Re-edit and Present.  Palgrave Studies in Cyberpsychology. Palgrave Macmilan; UK.

Attrill, A. & Fullwood, C. (Eds.) (2016). Applied Cyberpsychology. Palgrave Macmillan; UK.

Book Chapters

Attrill, A. (2016). The role of culture in online behaviour.  In Attrill, A., & Fullwood, C. (Eds.) (2016). Applied Cyberpsychology. Palgrave Macmillan; UK.

Attrill, A. (2016). Introduction to applied Cyberpsychology.  In Attrill, A., & Fullwood, C. (Eds.) (2016). Applied Cyberpsychology. Palgrave Macmillan; UK.

Derrer-Rendall, N., & Attrill, A. (2016). Online consumer behaviour. In Attrill, A., & Fullwood, C. (Eds.) (2016). Applied Cyberpsychology. Palgrave Macmillan; UK.

Attrill. A. (2015). Introduction to cyberpsychology. In Attrill. A. (Ed.) (2015). Cyberpsychology, OUP, England.

Attrill. A. (2015). Age versus goal-directed Internet use. In Attrill. A. (Ed.) (2015). Cyberpsychology, OUP, England.

Myddleton, J. & Attrill, A. (2015). Online relationships. In Attrill. A. (Ed.) (2015). Cyberpsychology, OUP, England.

Attrill, A. (2012). Self-disclosure online. In Encyclopedia of Cyber Behavior. Ing pulishers: New York.

Further information

Conference Presentations 

Attrill, A., Fullwood, C., & Chadwick, D. (2015).  Catfish: The detection of red flags, dangers and suspicious behaviours in the pursuit of love online. Paper presented at the Social Networking in Cyberspace Conference, University of Wolverhampton, September, 2015.

Chadwick, D., Fullwood, C., & Attrill, A. (2015). On the hook: A content analysis of the characteristics of victims in Catfish the TV Show.  Paper presented at the Social Networking in Cyberspace Conference, University of Wolverhampton, September, 2015.

Fullwood, C., Attrill, A. & Chadwick, D. (2015). Reeling them in: A content analysis of perpetrator characteristics in Catfish the TV Show.  Paper presented at the Social Networking in Cyberspace Conference, University of Wolverhampton, September, 2015.

Attrill, A. (2014). Collision of the self online and offline – the need to combine academic theory and research with offline applications of behaviour. Invited seminar series talk for the Division of Psychology, Staffordshire University, October, 2014.

Attrill, A. (2014). Online self-creation: A consideration of current research for non-academic applications. CRUW/Cyberpsychology Research Conference. University of Wolverhampton, May, 2014.

Rai, R., & Attrill, A. (2014). The effects of synchronous and asynchronous Internet communication, personality, and representations of the self on the uptake of online video communication. Poster presented at the 16th International Conference on Human Computer Interaction, Crete, June 2014.

Attrill, A. (2013). The interplay of perceived realness and perceived consequences of diverse Facebook communications on varied recipients.  Paper to be presented at the Social Networking in Cyberspace Conference, Wolverhampton, July, 2013.

Barker, E., & Attrill, A. (2013). Personality characteristics, social support, self-esteem and age predictors of domain-specific Internet use.  Poster presented at the First Annual Cyberpsychology Conference, Leicester, September, 2013.

Myddleton, J., & Attrill, A. (2013). Individuals’ levels of perceived reality and perceived consequences of online behaviour in relation to cyberbullying perpetration. Poster presented at the First Annual Cyberpsychology Conference, Leicester, September, 2013.

Attrill, A. (2012). Theoretical considerations and implications of current online self-disclosure research: Is it the quantity or quality of sharing that counts? Paper to be presented at the Second Annual Cyberpsychology Conference, Bolton University, July 2012.

Attrill, A. (2012). The self online.  Psychology Seminar Series Presentation at De Montfort University, April 2012.

Attrill, A., & MacLeod, M.D. (2006).  The power of personal significance in protecting the self against retrieval inhibition.  Poster presented at the British Psychological Society Annual Conference, Cardiff, March, 2006.

Attrill, A., & MacLeod, M.D. (2004).  Goal-directedness and the occurrence of retrieval-induced forgetting for positive and negative self- and other-referent trait adjectives.  Poster presented at the 5th Annual Meeting of the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Austin, Texas.

Attrill, A., & MacLeod, M.D. (2004).  Studying goal-directed active inhibition processes for self- and other-referent trait information.  Paper presented at the Postgraduate Social Psychology Conference, CambridgeUniversity.

Attrill, A., & MacLeod, M.D. (2004).  Do I constantly think of me, or do I actively forget uncharacteristic self-referent information?  Poster presented at the 51st British Psychology Society, Social Psychology Section Conference, University of Liverpool.