Dr Tom Dickins

Course Leader Linguistics

Dr Thomas Dickins 2
Email address: T.Dickins@wlv.ac.uk Phone number: 01902 322460 Location: MX Building, MX112(b) Faculty: Faculty of Arts School/Institute: - School of Humanities Areas of expertise: Linguistics, Russian, Czech

About

Tom Dickins’s background is in Russian and Czech language and literature. He teaches on a wide range of modules, and has been Course Leader for Linguistics for several years. His current research interests relate primarily to applied linguistics: in particular, Czech lexicology, language variation and change, linguistic purism and loanwords, and language and political discourse.

Research interests

I am a senior lecturer and Course Leader for Linguistics in the Faculty of Arts. My main research interests relate to applied Slavonic linguistics: in particular, Czech lexicology, language variation and change, linguistic purism and loanwords, and language and political discourse.

Membership of professional bodies

  • January 2009 – Member of the editorial board of Czech language journal, Studie z aplikované lingvistiky (Studies in Applied Linguistics), published by the Philosophical Faculty of Charles University (Prague).

Qualifications

  • Senior Fellow, HEA, 2016.
  • PhD (by published work): ‘Selected aspects of language contact in the case of Czech, with a particular focus on lexical borrowing and changing attitudes to the self and others’, University of Wolverhampton, 2012.
  • PGCE: Qualified to teach Russian, French and English, (awarded Wortley Year Prize for theory of education), University of Nottingham, School of Education, 1986.
  • MA (by research): ‘Critical responses to Socialist Realism in Czech literature: 1958–1969. A study of selected works by Josef Škvorecký, Bohumil Hrabal and Milan Kundera’, University of Leeds, 1983.
  • BA (Hons): Russian Studies (with 3-year French Subsidiary), University of Leeds, 1981.

Publications

Articles, Book Chapters etc.

  • 'Folk-Spectrum Music as an Expression of Alterity in "Normalization" Czechoslovakia (1969–89): Context, Constraints and Characteristics', Slavonic and East European Review, 95, 4, 2017, pp. 648-690.
  • ‘The Linguistic and Rhetorical Legacy of the Prague Spring: Reading the Czechoslovak Communist Party Daily, Rudé právo, from the Late 1980s’, Central Europe, 20 (20), 2016, pp. 1–23.
  • ‘The Impact Factor of the Language of Czechoslovak Normalization: A Study of the Seminal Work, Poučení z krizového vývoje ve straně a společnosti po XIII. sjezdu KSČ’, Slavonic and East European Review, 93 (2), 2015, pp. 213–250.
  • ‘Attitudes to the notion of “foreign”, as reflected in the Czech lexicon since the end of the nineteenth century’, in Montserrat Cots, Pere Gifra-Adroher & Glyn Hambrook (editors), Interrogating Gazes: Comparative Critical Views on the Representation of Foreignness and Otherness (Bern, Berlin, Brussels, Frankfurt am Main, New York, Oxford, Vienna: Peter Laing, 2013), pp. 101–109.
  • ‘Historical “signposts” and other temporal indicators in the Czech lexicon’, The Slavonic and East European Review 90 (4), 2012, pp. 601–41.
  • ‘The Czech-speaking lands, their peoples and contact communities: titles, names and ethnonyms’, The Slavonic and East European Review 89 (3), 2011, pp. 401–454.
  • Attitudes to lexical borrowing in the Czech Republic (Liberec: Nakladatelství Bor, 2009).
  • ‘Češi a slovenština’, Naše společnost 7 (1), 2009, pp. 12–26.
  • ‘Postoje k výpůjčkám v soudobé češtině’, Naše společnost 6 (1), 2008, pp. 14–28.
  • ‘The legacy and limitations of Czech purism’, Slavonica 13 (2), 2007, pp. 113–33.
  • ‘Russian and Soviet loanwords and calques in the Czech lexicon since the beginning of the twentieth century’, The Slavonic and East European Review 84 (4), 2006, pp. 593–638.
  • ‘Representations of Russian and Soviet society in standard Czech reference dictionaries’, Central Europe 2 (2), 2004, pp. 133–59.
  • ‘Gender differentiation and the asymmetrical use of animate nouns in contemporary Czech’, The Slavonic and East European Review 79 (2), 2001, pp. 212–47.
  • ‘Changing ideologies in Slovník jazyka českého (1937–52)’, Slavonica 7 (1), 2000, pp. 24–74.
  • ‘Reflections of ideology in Slovník jazyka českého (1946-52)’, in Robert Pynsent (editor), The Phoney Peace: Central European Politics and Culture, 1945–1949 (London: London University Press, 2000), pp. 359–84.
  • ‘Prepositional vocalization in contemporary Czech’, The Slavonic and East European Review 76 (2), 1998, pp. 201–33.
  • ‘Linguistic varieties in Czech: problems of the spoken language’, Slavonica 1 (2), 1995, pp. 20 46. Reprinted (with amendments): Ročenka Kruhu moderních filologů 21, 1997, pp. 58–87.

Teaching and Learning Materials

  • (with Irina Moore), S azov (Russian from Scratch), University of Wolverhampton, 2004 A4, comb-bound: 536 pp. (Online version available at http://www.gefix.net/sazov/)
  • Spoken Czech: Situational Dialogues for Intermediate Level Students (13 scenes on video with accompanying textbook, including an introductory chapter: ‘Notes on the development of the literary language and on different linguistic registers in Czech’), University of Wolverhampton, 1993.

Book Reviews 

  • Tomasz Kamusella, The Politics of Language and Nationalism in Modern Central Europe (Basingstoke, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012), in The Slavonic and East European Review 91 (4), 2013.
  • James Wilson, Moravians in Prague. A Sociolinguistic Study of Dialect Contact in the Czech Republic (Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang, 2010), in The Slavonic and East European Review 89 (3), 2011.
  • Lubomír Štrougal, Paměti a úvahy [Memoirs and Reflections] (Prague: Epocha, 2009) in The Slavonic and East European Review 89 (2), 2011. 
  • (with Eric Dickins), Jenny Carl & Patrick Stevenson (eds), Language, Discourse and Identity in Central Europe. The German Language in a Multilingual Space (Houndsmill, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), in Slovo a slovesnost 71 (2), 2011.
  • Tora Hedin, Changing Identities: Language Variation on Czech Television (Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2005), in The Slavonic and East European Review 85 (4), 2007.
  • James Naughton, Colloquial Czech, in Irish Slavonic Studies 1, 2000.
  • Kevin Hannan, Borders of Language and Identity in Teschen Silesia, in Czech Language News 9, 1997.
  • Robert B. Pynsent, Questions of Identity: Czech and Slovak Ideas of Nationality and Personality, in Irish Slavonic Studies 1, 1996.
  • František Čermák, Jan Holub, Jiří Hronek, Milan Šára & David Short, A multi-level course for advanced Czech learners (2 Vols), in The Slavonic and East European Review 76 (2), 1995.
  • Milena Kelly, Czech for You, in Czech Language News 2, 1994.

Further information

External Examining

  • 2013 – Department of Russian and Slavonic Studies, University of Sheffield, BA (Hons) and MA degree examinations in Russian Studies (Czech).
  • 2004 – 2009 Department of Languages, Coventry Business School, University of Coventry, BA (Hons) degree examinations in Russian.
  • 2004 – 2008 Department of Russian and Slavonic Studies, University of Sheffield, BA (Hons) and MA degree examinations in Russian Studies (Czech).
  • 1988 – 2003 The Centre for Modern Languages, University of Birmingham, B.Eng., M.Eng. (etc.) degree examinations (Russian).
  • 1998 – 2003 CREES, University of Birmingham, BA (Hons) and MA degree examinations in Russian.
  • 1998 – 2003 University of Durham, BA (Hons) and MA degree examinations in Czech.
  • 1996 – 1999 University of Leeds, BA (Hons) degree examinations in Russian (Czech).
  • 1995 – 1997 European Business School (Russian language, level 200).
  • 1995 – 1996 University of Birmingham, BA (Hons) degree examinations in Russian (Czech).

Teaching

  • Language in Use (Level 4)
  • Language and Society (Level 5)
  • Research Methods for English Language, Linguistics and TESOL (Level 5)
  • Language Variation and Change (Level 6)
  • Russian Language (Basic and Elementary)