Life through a lens

 

The Slow Light exhibition will be open at the School of Art & Design from Wednesday, 18 March to Friday, 29 May 2009.

The exhibition features images created by photographer Justin Quinnell using six-month duration exposures over Bristol. A pinhole camera will be set up throughout the exhibition to offer an insight into the School of Art & Design over the three months.

Pinhole photography is lens free photography, and is a method of capturing images using a simple light-tight box with a single pinhole in one end. Images can be taken slowly over time and the process involves being creative with the light from the sun.

Justin will also be giving a lecture to staff and students and providing a workshop for first year students on the BA (Hons) Photography course as part of the Alternative and Experimental photography module.

Su Fahy, Dvisional Leader for Fine Art and Photography, said: “Pinhole photography is interesting to students as it offers a chance to experience the random effects of light and experimental exposures, using no man made optics. The world can be viewed from a different perspective and, as the exhibition will show, track the light of the sun and capture time in a different visual form.

‘Slow Light’ will be open to the general public from Wednesday, March 18 to Friday, May 29, from 9am to 5pm, on weekdays only. The exhibition is in the Long Gallery on the ground floor of the School of Art and Design (MK) building, just off the Wolverhampton Ring Road.

The exhibition coincides with World Pinhole Day (www.pinholeday.org)  in April and will be posted on the website.

Further information

For media inquiries, contact Vickie Woodward in the Press Office on 01902 322736 or 07973 335112.

Justin Quinnell lives in Bristol. His pinhole photography has gained its reputation through local and national exhibitions, the worldwide web, lomography and through the pages of the British and international photographic press. He works as a professional photographer and is an associate lecturer in photography at the University of Falmouth

 

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