Wolverhampton Strategic Priority Projects 2016-17

 

Wolverhampton Strategic Priority Projects - Bid Document (Word doc 1,466k)

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Does good learning space lead to enhanced teaching and learning and or student satisfaction?

 

Does good learning space lead to enhanced teaching and learning and or student satisfaction?

 

Dr Rebecca Butler MChem (Hons) CSci CChem MRSC FHEA PGCert

 

 ABSTRACT

For effective contemporary flexible learning HE needs to explore mechanisms for student agency. Teaching takes place within laboratories, lecture/tutorial sessions and the virtual environment. Learning goes on within and beyond these spaces into informal spaces provided or created by students; and learning occurs individually and in groups. Despite huge investments in new learning spaces across the HE sector very little is understood about the relationship between learning and the spaces designed for learning. The study aims to discover how students explore and negotiate the formal and informal spaces the institution provides and how they ‘own’ or transform these to become learning environments. Understanding how students utilise space and learn within the spaces they inhabit, will enable the HE sector to actively harness and enhance those spaces for independent and co-learning opportunities and design better learning spaces in the future.

 

 

Virtually virtual: The use of augmented reality to enhance the laboratory learning environment

Virtually virtual: The use of augmented reality to enhance the laboratory learning environment

 Project Team:

Martin Khechara1, Sara Smith1, James Pearson-Jenkins2 & Matthew Aldridge2

1 Faculty of Science and Engineering (FoSE)

2 Faculty of Education Health and Wellbeing (FEHW)

 

 ABSTRACT

The University of Wolverhampton has a well-established history of embracing innovative learning technology in the classroom. Institutional adoption of the Panopto video capture system has led to the pedagogically informed design of laboratory areas for the Rosalind Franklyn building and the revolutionary design of a new laboratory learning environment for clinical skills.

 Augmented reality (AR) is a form of virtual reality where digital information is added to the real world via mobile devices to provide static or dynamic content which can aid understanding of complex tasks or provide additional interactive content that otherwise would not be available. The use of this technology has been shown to increase student motivation, understanding and satisfaction in their studies.

 The aim of this project is to investigate if the provision of information using AR in laboratories can enhance student understanding, improve content delivery and address priority 2 of the Wolverhampton Strategic Priority Project: How can we use virtual learning spaces to increase student satisfaction with teaching on my course as measured by NSS section 1: the teaching on my course (questions 1-4).

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Towards an LGBTQ+ Inclusive Curriculum at the University of Wolverhampton

Towards an LGBTQ+ Inclusive Curriculum at the University of Wolverhampton

Dr Rosie Miles, Reader in English Literature and Pedagogy

Dr Sammy Li, Lecturer in the Business School

 ABSTRACT

 This project has emerged out of the attendance of a number of staff at the inaugural “LGBTQ Inclusivity in Higher Education” Conference at the University of Birmingham, 15-16/09/16.  There is increasing awareness in HE of our diverse student populations and it is important for LGBTQ+ students to see themselves represented and included in HE curricula, in terms of LGBTQ contributions to the knowledge that constitutes our various disciplines. This is not just important for LGBTQ students, but all students.

Feedback from several sessions at the Birmingham Conference suggested that academic staff do not always know how to make their curricula more inclusive concerning LGBTQ issues, and a report produced by the Equality Challenge Unit in 2009 on the experiences of LGBT staff and students in HE suggested two-thirds of LGB students were not out to their tutors (61.3%) or lecturers (64.3%) for fear of discrimination (p. 4).  While the climate may well have changed since 2009, this suggests that LGBT students are less sure of what kinds of assumptions, omissions and prejudices may occur (whether unwittingly or not) in HE classrooms.  This project will contribute to making our curricula at the UoW more genuinely LGBTQ-inclusive, both to develop staff and students’ awareness of the values at the heart of our learning community, and to satisfy the expectations of students as to our inclusivity.

Through this project we will provide concrete examples to colleagues and feedback (from students) that can help academic staff at the UoW better understand the importance of including LGBTQ role models/materials/examples, etc., in teaching.  The project will conclude with an event in May 2017 to facilitate further discussion on these issues and to share the key findings of the project.